Casio g shock gw 5000

Casio g shock gw 5000

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Casio g shock gw 5000

There are a number of G-shock watches that Casio produces only for sale to the Japanese domestic market (JDM). Some of these are upgraded or specialized versions of common G-Shock models. This list of Japan-only G-Shocks focuses on the 5000-series models. Current models that are part of the 5000-series include the common DW-5600 and the GW-M5610 models. Other 5000-series models that are less well-known but recognizable to G-Shock enthusiasts include the DW-D5500, GW-5500, and the widely exalted origin model GW-5000 . The 5000-series is the most historically significant G-Shock line as it descends directly from the original G-Shock from 1983, the DW-5000C-1A. In the past the only way to get the JDM G-Shock models was through personal contacts in Japan, but now thanks to the efficiency of e-commerce they are easily obtainable. You will have to pay a premium for these imports but their uniqueness makes up for it. They are also excellent selections for those who want to go shopping for G-shock watches in Japan to take home a special memento. Here are the Japanese import G-shock 5000-series watches that are worth looking into. Many people who fall in love with G-Shock and start building a collection will eventually start thinking about getting the GW-5000, sometimes to the point of obsession. Others who are new to G-Shock may want a premium watch with a classic design that is a step above the typical model. The GW-5000 is a simple watch with a body that is based on the first G-Shock ever, the DW-5000C. Like the first G-Shock it has a screw-lock case back and is the only current G-Shock along with the Frogman that has this feature. It adds modern features like Tough Solar power and Multi-Band 6 atomic time-syncing. While its look is intentionally basic and its features are not the most advanced available, it is considered a “prestige” G-Shock because of its high price and because in addition to its screw-back with diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, it has a full stainless steel case under the bezel while standard 5600 models have a plastic case. It also has a nicer overall finish than a 5600 model and uses a softer and more comfortable urethane band. The GW-5000 is exclusively made in Japan which accounts for its higher price. Only the most observant and knowledgeable G-Shock enthusiasts will recognize this watch on the street. While it won’t buy you instant status with the general public, owning the GW-5000 is one of the best ways to express your appreciation of G-Shock and its history. Technically it’s not a 5000 series G-Shock but the GXW-56 series is considered to be part of the “square” family and is clearly based on the 5600 body. It can be described simply as an over-sized and extreme version of the 5600. Previously available internationally as the GX-56, that model was discontinued and it is now only available as the GXW-56 from Japan with Tough Solar/Multi-Band 6. This extra large watch measures 55.5 x 53.6 x 17.5mm and is nicknamed “The King” by the hardcore G-Shock fans. It’s extra large size gives it even more protection than a typical G-Shock and it is very likely one of the toughest G-Shock models ever made. Its protected button design also offers mud and dust resistance. Those who are hesitant to wear a large watch should stay far away. For those who want one of the largest all-digital G-Shock watches the GXW-56 is a dream come true. The GXW-56-1BJF pictured here has light yellow lettering and a standard LCD display. It is also available as the GXW-56-1AJF with a red-accented face, red buttons, and reverse display. For the man in uniform: GW-M5610BC-1JF Composite Band G-Shock The GW-M5610BC-1JF is a solar and atomic powered GW-M5610 with a composite metal/resin band with a traditional folding clasp. Its low profile would go well with uniforms while its composite band and reverse display gives it a tough, no-nonsense look. The metal part of the band is treated with a black ion plating. This Japanese model is suggested for those who are concerned that a traditional resin band may not be durable enough over the long haul, or for those who want to be able to put on and remove the watch very quickly and easily. Another good use for this watch is to swap out the composite band with the GW-5000. If you like the reverse display but would rather have a traditional resin band, there is also the GW-M5610-1BJF . The reason to buy the GW-S5600-1JF is for its distinctive carbon fiber insert band but it comes at a premium price. Unlike some of the aviation models and Japanese market Master of G watches featuring bands with carbon fiber inserts that can only be seen on the inner side of the band, the carbon fiber pattern can be distinctly seen from the outer side of the band on this model. In addition to this unique design the dark bezel is glossy and translucent, making this Japanese import a good choice if you want your G-Shock to stand out from the crowd. The GW-5510-1BJF is basically a DW-D5500 (amazon) with Tough Solar, Multi-Band 6, stealth lettering, and a reverse display. It is also available in black with a standard display (GW-5510-1JF) and a white version (see Amazon link). The 5510 case with its covered buttons is a direct descendant of the 1985 DW-5500C which was also known as “G-Shock II” and was the first model to be nicknamed the Mudman for its mud and dust resistance. The 5500 is not a commonly seen G-Shock on the street and those who like its retro look would be wise to upgrade to this maintenance-free Japanese version. For the surfer or fisherman: GWX-5600C-7JF Solar Tide G-Shock The GWX-5600 G-Lide is like the GLX-5600 with its tide and moon graph and adds Tough Solar and Multi-Band 6. This makes it a top choice for surfers who want an unobtrusive, low profile tide watch that is solar powered and has atomic timekeeping. The watch comes in white (GWX-5600C-7JF), red (GWX-5600C-4JF) and black (GWX-5600-1JF). This model was previously available internationally but was discontinued and some of that stock can still be found at a reasonable price. The black version features an unusual color scheme with orange, yellow, and blue lettering. Bull bar face protectors were a common site on G-Shock 5600 models in the 90s and were particularly popular with skateboarders. They aren’t as widespread now but there is still some demand for them both as a retro fashion accessory and a protective add-on. The DW-5600P-1JF (black), DW-5600P-4JF (red), and DW-5600P-9JF (yellow) are some of the only current G-Shock models that include a bull bar. These Japanese models are based on the basic battery-powered DW-5600, so they are the most affordable watches on this list. The fact that the orange-accented GW-M5610R-1JF exists makes us wonder why there aren’t a lot of other similarly accented 5600 models for sale in Japan. It’s a great looking watch with its orange lettering, ring-dial, and orange-tinted standard LCD display. Perhaps it would be best suited for rescue workers or someone with an orange team jersey or shirt like a die-hard fan of the Broncos, Browns, Bengals, or Orioles. There is also a light-blue accented GW-M5610BA-1JF and a lime green-accented GW-M5610B-1J that are still available but no longer part of the current lineup.

I’ve been enjoying a new Casio GW-5000 for about a month now. As a devoted Casio fan and a longtime previous wearer of the GW-M5600 as my regular “beater,” I had been admiring the GW-5000 from afar for quite a long time. I decided it was time to pull the trigger and acquire the definitive G-Shock. Many, many threads have been posted already analyzing this watch to death. “Is it worth the money?” is the predominant theme. This thread will not attempt to answer that question for anyone else. For many, its current $400 retail price can seem like a lot to pay for a G-Shock that outwardly looks so similar to other models that cost a fraction of that. But, in the grand scheme of watch collecting, this is not an expensive watch. If its rarity, uniqueness, aesthetics, and all-in pleasure of ownership are strong, then it is actually a small price to pay. Arrival of the parcel is always fun. I love JDM products. The cool little packages within packages, all the funky stickers & tags, a “tourist” warranty card that’s serialized to the watch. The Japanese language manual that’s folded to miniscule proportions and wrapped in an implausibly small and tight pouch. (I’m not gonna try and take it out). A 39,900 yen price tag. All fun stuff. (By the way, what’s with that strange Japanese wrapping substance that’s kind of half paper, half plastic, half weird waxy substrate? What actually is that stuff?) First impression of the watch out of the box – it feels hefty! The facts bear out the “seat of the pants” observation. Per my postal scale, the GW-M5600 weighs 1.7 ounces, while the GW-5000 weighs 2.6 ounces – over 50% more. The DLC case is beautifully done and that dark black-chrome finish is deep, glossy, and mesmerizing. On the M5600, because everything’s plastic & kind of blended together, it isn’t so apparent that you have a separate case and protective bezel. But handling the 5000, you can’t miss that fact. Cool. I took off the M5600 and strapped on the 5000. One of the endearing things of the M5600 is that it’s light as a feather and you barely know you have anything at all on. Its comfort is supreme. The 5000 does have a barely perceptible amount of “watch flop” that the M5600 lacks. Is not uncomfortable, and not objectionable, and don’t get me wrong, it’s not anything like my WVA320 in heft or bulk, but it’s detectable. And in a good way – its weight adds some gravitas, commensurate with its position as the “Alpha” G. The build quality is noticeably better on the 5000. Hard to put a finger on it. While the M5600 really has no noticeable flaws, the 5000 still somehow feels superior, & borderline luxurious. That could partially be for psychological reasons . . . the Veblen Effect in action? But not totally. For one, there’s the supple, seductive silky soft strap. Its deep, matte, velvety blackness makes the M5600’s strap seem more plasticky and common by comparison. Maybe it’s the feel of DLC metal touching your wrist, or at least the knowledge that it’s there. The heft of the watch probably factors in. Its “Made In Japan” pedigree. The subtle, simpler, cleaner, classier dial markings and monochromatic color scheme looks more mature. (did you realize the dial surround of the M5600 has printing in 5 different colors?). The LCD display on the 5000 is just a hair more vivid / clear / contrasty, and is “grayer” in color tone, versus the M5600 which has more of a tan hue. Not all of these items are physical differences or are fully perceptible; so, is it just me, and the Veblen Effect again? Whatever. To someone hyper-vigilant like me, I notice all of these differences -- including the real, the perceived, and the emotional, and they add up to a distinctively different feel on the wrist. The knowledge that I am wearing the “best” G-Shock I’m sure influences this feel. Whatever the reasons (fair or unfair), and the psychology behind them (or not), early returns are in -- and the verdict is that this is a watch that is absolutely satisfying on the wrist. Enjoyable. Perhaps surprisingly so. A secret pleasure to privately savor that the world will never notice. Capeesh? A few other random tidbits, in no particular order: • Interesting that the 5000 uses a “dot” to separate the month and day on the date, and the M5600 uses a dash. I prefer the dash – maybe just because it’s what I’m visually used to. • LOVE, LOVE, LOVE that the 5000 has separate “UTC” and “LON” timezones in world time mode! Versus only having “LON” on the M5600, and everyone knows London goes on DST in the summer. This feature alone just delights me, and gives the GW-5000 big bonus points. • The 5000 doesn’t display the current time in any other modes; the M5600 does in countdown timer mode only. • To those who worry that the 5000 will wear larger than the M5600: the size of the 5000 is just fine. The delta between the two is truly immaterial. The difference in ride height is barely noticeable. Either one slides unencumbered under a dress shirt cuff. • When it’s on your wrist, if you look straight on at the side of the watch, you can see a layer of DLC steel peeking out below the bezel. Fun. • The shape is slightly different. The 5000 is just a hair more “square” versus the M5600 being a shade more “rectangular.” • The buttons are a little more sheltered on the 5000 versus the M5600. I find them harder to press. • Another fun little idiosyncrasy I noted. I enjoy the hourly chime feature on a watch. All my other Casio’s (even thinking back to my W-200 Marlin from, say, 1980?) go “beep beep” on the top of the hour. The GW-5000 goes “beepbeep.” Quicker, with barely any gap between the two tones. When the GW-M5600 and my WVA320 chime in perfect unison, this one outpaces them by a half step. I suppose that’s appropriate. • I like the bolder “CASIO” branding that’s top and center on the dial surround on the 5000. On the M5600, the “CASIO” is small and gets lost with all the other text. • On my M5600’s, I have cut the strap to precisely fit my wrist and eliminate the long tail sticking out past the keeper. It was hard to bring myself to cut the 5000’s luscious rubbery strap, but I did. I took a deep breath, and with a brand new single sided razor blade cut about an inch off the GW-5000 strap. It is perfectly tailored for my wrist now, with no flappy “tail”. Believe me, I measured about five times and drew a little template on an index card just to be safe before cutting.... • I purchased a replacement strap and bezel from PacParts. The Casio part numbers are as follows: Bezel 10323532; Soft strap 10323536. Supposedly the bezel is interchangeable with the DW-5600E, but the part numbers are different and the “real” GW-5000 parts are made in Japan out of superior materials. The buckle on the strap is stamped "Japan". It feels good to have some extras on hand. • This watch is a definite keeper. I love it. All this said, the comparison also reflects very well on the GWM5600 – and what a bargain it is. It is 85 percent of the watch of the 5000, for 25 percent of the price. Thanks to our falling dollar, a new GW5000 currently sells for well over $400 on the Bay, and just under $400 from Seiya. Hope you enjoyed this review. Cheers.

I really loved this watch, but ultimately decided to return and just continue using my basic $50 DW-5600-E that I picked up at a big box store (which by the way is no slouch, with at rating of 4.6 and over 1,550 reviews). Here are some of the differences and my impressions, and why I decided to return: - Looks: Absolutely gorgeous watch with tremendous build quality. The epitome of "rugged good looks". If you are a fan of this classic G-Shock model then this alone may be reason enough for you to buy. I love the cleaner look on the face; no colors and less busy. The watch itself definitely has a little more weight (74 grams) than the DW-5600-E (52 grams), obviously due to the stainless steel casing. Many reviewers have mentioned the "diamond-like coating" or whatever. I admit it looks beautiful but the fact is that this part is facing your wrist when wearing, so it`s not like you see it. But you do see the front, and the clean, non-colored lines just look awesome. That said, the DW-5600 has a cleaner look than some of the other versions in this series, and so is adequate. - Comfort. Both watches are comfortable, but the GW-5000-1JF does have a more comfortable band. The rubber is just a little softer, more "supple". This said, the DW-5600-E is certainly not uncomfortable, and in fact due to the lighter weight it is arguably more wearable 24/7 (though this is subjective). - Atomic time syncing. The GW-5000 has it, the DW-5600 doesn`t. I really had to think a lot about this one, and how important this was to me. On the one hand, it is great to know that you never have to reset your watch, and that it always has the correct time. When I received the GW-5000, multiple times I tried to manually sync but was having difficulty, likely due to clouds in my area at the time. However that same night the time updated automatically at around 2:00 AM, in spite of the clouds. Indeed, about 25%+ of the manual is dedicated to explaining all the conditions where the syncing may not work. But based on my experience, as well as other reviewers, I do not expect there would be many problems with this. As for my DW-5600, two weeks ago to the day I manually set the time to atomic time. Two weeks later it reads 1 second fast. This translates to approximately 2 seconds per month and 24 seconds per year. I decided I can live with that, as it literally takes just seconds to reset the time. - Solar power. Again the GW-5000 has it, the DW-5600 does not. Again it seems to be a cool feature. But then I began to consider a few other things. Multiple reviewers on the DW-5600 say they got 5+ years out of the battery, and then went to Wal-Mart or wherever to get another and replaced themselves. On the other hand, the GW-5000 (a) may last 10-15 years but (b) would still eventually need a replacement battery and (c) which would no doubt be more expensive, (d) and would likely need to be ordered, and (e) would then need to be taken to a jeweler to replace, when at the same time (f) in 10-15 years who knows what watches will be available, including the latest version of this G-Shock, in which case I may want to replace the whole watch anyway!. So again I decided that this was a cool feature but overall not an important one. - Alarms. The GW-5000 has 5 alarms including a snooze. Personally I do not have a need for this many alarms, but I can certainly see applications for this. That said, I would love to have the "snooze" feature, which the DW-5600 does not have. The fact is that on both watches the alarm is simply not very loud, nor is there any vibration feature. Because of this I would never trust this watch to wake me up, perhaps not even with a snooze feature. For this reason I decided that the differences in alarm features were not important enough for me to keep the GW-5000. - Countdown timer. This is where things start to get a little interesting, if not outright peculiar: When setting the timer on the GW-5000, the controls allow bi-directional capabilities. In other words, if the timer is currently set to 10 minutes and you want to reset it for 5 minutes, you can go directly to "5" (and if you accidentally pass it can use another button to go back up). In this same scenario on the DW-5600 however, to change the timer from 10 minutes to 5 minutes you can only go one direction (up), which means you have to pass through 11 up to 59, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and finally back to 5 (and if you accidentally pass 5 you have to do this again). For this reason alone I almost kept the GW-5000, because the implementation of setting the timer is just so much better. And I use the timer all the time, such as when I`m on the grill, when I`m allocating play time remaining for my 4 year old, to when I need to put my ear plugs in before descending on a plane. HOWEVER... there are two areas where the DW-5600 timer features actually exceeds the GW-5000: (a) The DW-5600 allows you to set seconds (for example, set to 10 minutes and 45 seconds). Curiously the GW-5000 only allows minutes; (b) As with other G-Shock models, when changing modes in the DW-5600 the time is still visible in all modes. It is absolutely baffling that in this high end, expensive GW-5000 model that it is not! This to me is a tremendous flaw as there is no reference to the time when in timer moode. And I do not want to hear that Casio is just "being faithful to the original design from decades ago" or whatever, because atomic time and solar power were also not in the original design, yet Casio saw fit to update this glorious model with the latest technology. But for some reason on these features they did not. Shrug. - Light. The GW-5000 has a nice feature where if you tilt the wrist, the light will come on (and they`ve even made it where this only happens in low-light conditions, which saves battery power; a very nice feature/design). The DW-5600 does not have this featue. However, again there is a deficiency here when compared with the DW-5600: Where the light on the DW-5600 will stay on for 3 seconds, the light on the GW-5000 will only stay on for 2 seconds. I suppose that there is a subjective element here and that some may consider the shorter time to be preferable. However, I personally had problems with this. There were several times when the light just wasn`t on long enough for me to see the time. I`ve never had this problem with the DW-5600. Also there is no way (on either watch) to change this setting to a longer or shorter time, which is a shame. Again, your mileage may very on this, but it was at times a struggle for me. Also, know that on virtually all Casio G-Shock models there is no way to keep the light on in any mode when making changes, nor to keep the light on. So for example, if you`re all tucked into bed and remember that you need to set the alarm, be prepared to get up and turn the light on so you can see to set the alarm. Which to me is quite peculiar and dysfunctional. So, the bottom-line is this: The GW-5000-1JF is an absolutely beautiful watch. If this watch for you represents some sort of nostalgic trip to the past, or if you just want the best looking watch in this model, then this is your watch. It is a combination of beautiful and rugged. But the fact is this: For $150-180 you can buy a similar model with exactly the same features, and also made in Japan (see GW-M5610-1BJF or GW-M5610BC-1JF). These do not include a steel case however (though they are lighter). So basically, you are paying an extra $150 for the steel case, and the cleaner look. As much as I loved the watch, I just couldn`t justify the steeper price, especially when there were a couple of significant areas where I considered it deficient to my DW-5600. Barring these deficiencies, I would have kept the watch. I just like the look and feel of it so much. For the future, I hope Casio will consider correcting these differences, and also perhaps adding in a vibration feature (but one that is more powerful than the GD-350, which was too weak). One last note to an already too long review: My wrists are approximately 7.25". When I first put this watch on it looked small. I had been wearing something with a slightly bigger face. However, after wearing a couple of days the look really grew on me, and it no longer seemed too small. I do wish the face was about 20% larger, but unless you just have huge wrists I wouldn`t be concerned about the size. It`s a great looking watch, tough and rugged looked but more subdued than some of the other G-Shock models. Good luck and peace be with you.